Tag: digital humanities Page 1 of 2

Exploring Cultural Ownership Through Linked Open Data: A Study of the British Museum’s Egyptian Collection

Mock grant proposal to support the improvement of the British Museum’s existing provenance linked data for its collection of 100,000+ Egyptian-made cultural artifacts. The expansion of the British Museum’s provenance linked data will allow the museum’s collection to be more fully represented in linked data visualizations, while making visualizations of the artifacts themselves more comprehensive, improving scholars’ capacity to research the histories of these artifacts and those of the cultures that produced them.

Data from Local 496 Union List

The Semantic Lab: Local 496 Project and Batiste Project

The Local 496 Project transforms the American Federation of Music’s Local 496 union list into a semantic data network. This document is a 1940’s directory of the segregated African-American chapter of New Orleans jazz musicians. This project will highlight the Batiste family network, many of whom are listed in the directory.

Lincoln Center: Understanding Audience Interactions & Engagements on Facebook

Information gathered from Lincoln Center’s Facebook Insights was used to identify their most successful posts. A strategy was then established to further boost popular content and promote visitor engagement.

City tech Citation Grail Quest example

Digital Pedagogy and the Future of Digital Scholarship Librarianship

This talk will describe digital scholarship librarians’ use of digital pedagogy and changes in the field that will affect these librarians’ practice.

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Creating a Map on Carto

This video is part of my final project for Data Librarianship. It is the longer of two videos we had to create to demonstrate skills we learned in class. This video describes how to upload a dataset and create a simple map on Carto, a browser-based, freemium mapping platform.

A Visualization of Gothic Literature

To celebrate the 200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, this digital humanities project maps the letters in both Frankenstein and Dracula providing a representation of Gothic literature during the 19th Century.

Information Labor in American Experience Documentaries 2015-2017

This project originated as a paper reporting on the experiences of archival producers in the field of historical documentary production. Based on those conversations, I created a visualization of data comparing gender and production credits across American Experience documentaries from 2015 to 2017.

NAGPRA, Cultural Heritage, and Twenty-One Years of Repatriation

This project maps the recorded history of object repatriation through NAGPRA, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, with the hope of elucidating temporal and geographic trends in repatriation requests and concessions.

Cultural Galaxies: Linked Open Data in Museums

Our project considered the benefits and innovation linked open data has on museum collections. We reviewed how lod structures can be used to leverage and unite museum collections by examining how lod works, what museum projects utilize lod, and future possibilities.

Crowdsourcing in GLAMs

What is crowdsourcing and how does it apply to GLAMs (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums)? This poster explores the definition of crowdsourcing in cultural heritage institutions and the advantages and disadvantages of using crowdsourcing in these contexts.

Artists’ Books: A Dynamic Atlas

The project is a mock IMLS Grant Proposal for “Artists’ Books: A Dynamic Atlas.” This pilot project will use linked open data to create a dynamic mapping interface that indicates the home libraries of artists’ books located within New York. Led by the MoMA Library in partnership with the Frick Collection, Brooklyn Museum, Whitney Museum, and Metropolitan Museum, the dynamic atlas will deepen engagement with these unique collections; allow users to visualize connections between artists, books, and institutions; and make project data available for use on the open web.

“Fake News”: A Rhetorical Analysis

This project analyzes the circulation of the term “fake news” as a rhetorical device, used to make political assertions about the truth of various stories and sources. These sources range from longstanding and popular news outlets to more recent news websites and social media. Across these sources, we examine the use and users of the term “fake news”, its frequency of use, and the sources and topics that are described as “fake news”.

Women Behind the Page and On the Page in Comics: No Longer in Refrigerators?

By using web-scraping tools, I obtained data from fan-curated wikia pages concerning several comic book publishers. By assessing this data at several different points from 1995-2015, I sought to see if the proportion of women writers and artists in the comic book industry was increasing, if women artists and writers tend to more often work on female-fronted titles, and if that changes based on if the title is creator-owned or work-for-hire.

Day of DH: A Textual Analysis

This project examines definitions of digital humanities that were collected at the Day of DH conferences between 2009-2014, in order to identify themes and trends in the way the field has been defined over these years.

Resonating Words in Digital Humanities: A Brief Study of US Federal Government Treaties with Native American Nations

Treaties are living documents that link Native American Nations with the Federal Government of the United States, and their multifaceted conditions continue to raise numerous questions in our post colonial age. A combination of multiple word frequencies attempt to provide further insight in treaties with 142 Native American Nations.

Graphing Literature: Network Visualizations as a Literary Analysis Tool

This project examines how network visualizations can be used in literary analysis. I created a series of network graphs for three comics by B.K. Vaughn and used them to analyze the character structure in the comics and across Vaughn’s work.

Data Sousveillance: An Analysis of Cultural and Congressional Surveillance Rhetoric over Time

This study aims to shed light on conversations of surveillance over the past 40 years of American discourse, using a corpus of Congressional records, mainstream and independent news sources, movie scrips and reviews, and archival materials. By comparing general and specific sentiment measurement across these various sources, we examine points of similarity and difference in attitude across the present and past, cultural and countercultural, institutional and popular with regard to surveillance—watching surveillance, as it were, through assemblages of text and data.

Women Behind the Page and On the Page in Comics: No Longer in Refrigerators?

A frequent cultural topic is if women are regularly portrayed in mass media, and if they are present behind the scenes. Using data analysis, I looked at mass-marketed comics to see if women are increasingly being represented on both sides of the page.

Expanding the Linked Jazz Universe

Highlighting contributions to the Linked Jazz project, including the creation of linked data from historical photo metadata and, more recently, performance history data from Carnegie Hall and online jazz discographies.

Issues Between Copyright, Technology and the Visual Arts

In this digital era, the US Copyright office is not keeping up with technological development, which is keeping it from protecting the copyright of artists. They are the tortoise to technology’s hare, who keeps moving the finish line further ahead on the track. As technology alters our society and how we define visual art, how will visual artists control their copyright?