Tag: cultural heritage Page 1 of 3

Digitizing Cultural Heritage: Beyond Risk Management

In this paper, I discuss the history of copyright’s development, highlighting the steady increase in control of copyright holders as well as explaining the limited protections extended to libraries and archives. I use several case studies to illustrate the role of risk management and its uneven success in the digitization of library and archival resources. Finally, I propose several alternative ways of addressing the challenge that copyright poses, including the suggestion that judicial lawmaking would be an effective way to clarify the applicability of the fair use doctrine.

file formats

Supporting Software Preservation @ NYPL

As the Pratt Digital Preservation & Archives Fellow at NYPL, I’ve been working with the Library’s Digital Archivist to address issues surrounding software preservation. This presentation will discuss such digital preservation tools as Wikidata, PRONOM, and Archivematica—and how they’ve been implemented toward the long-term preservation of a proprietary software and its associated file formats.

Exploring Cultural Ownership Through Linked Open Data: A Study of the British Museum’s Egyptian Collection

Mock grant proposal to support the improvement of the British Museum’s existing provenance linked data for its collection of 100,000+ Egyptian-made cultural artifacts. The expansion of the British Museum’s provenance linked data will allow the museum’s collection to be more fully represented in linked data visualizations, while making visualizations of the artifacts themselves more comprehensive, improving scholars’ capacity to research the histories of these artifacts and those of the cultures that produced them.

Images from the New York Times’ George Tames collection

Poster showcase of the image of George Thames, White House photographer

Data from Local 496 Union List

The Semantic Lab: Local 496 Project and Batiste Project

The Local 496 Project transforms the American Federation of Music’s Local 496 union list into a semantic data network. This document is a 1940’s directory of the segregated African-American chapter of New Orleans jazz musicians. This project will highlight the Batiste family network, many of whom are listed in the directory.

Off-Off_Data

Exploring Linked Open Data for Off-Off-Broadway

Achieving Museum Diversity

This poster presents my research of how current art museum practices are shifting systematic gentrification of their audiences through diversifying staff, collections, and community engagement.

Visitors at the Museo Reina Sofia

User Experience Research, Learner Experience Design, and the Future Public Art Museum

The integration of UX practices into art museum operations helps to develop visitor experiences, but art museums have great responsibility to the communities of learners local to them. Art museums can focus on their roles as educators by applying LX (learner experience design) for effective meaning-making.

Publishing Linked Open Data (LOD) at the Whitney

This presentation provides an technical overview of initiating Linked Open Data (LOD) in the Whitney Museum of American Art as part of the 2017-2018 LOD for Museums Fellowship.

Digitizing the New York Times: George Tames photographs – Part II

In this second part of the two-part presentation, students from Projects in Digital Archives will introduce some of the technical aspects involved in digitizing the photographs of George Tames (New York Times Whitehouse photographer), including technical issues related to digitization, metadata, technology and design of the digital archive.

Digitizing the New York Times: George Tames photographs – Part I

Kevina Tidwell and Meg Edison will introduce a photography digitization project taken place at Pratt this semester in collaboration with the New York Times: the photographs of George Tames. George Tames is known as the “Photographer of Presidents.” He covered Washington, DC, as a news photographer for the New York Times from 1945 to 1985, photographing 10 United States presidents as well as many members of Congress and foreign leaders such as Winston Churchill and Nikita Kruschev. Tidwell will provide introduce the collection and provide historical background and context.

Politicizing Pepe and Preserving Probity: Visual Artists and Moral Rights Law in the United States

3D Scanning in Archives and Special Collections

This is a presentation on the uses of 3D Scanning to digitize and share objects from special collections and for cultural heritage. It will describe methods of 3D scanning and different ways to use the scans to digitize objects, connect with the public, share the objects with other institutions.

Making Available DykeTV – A Collaboration with the Lesbian Herstory Archives

In this presentation, students from the course LIS 668 Projects in Moving Image and Sound Archives present their work in digitizing, curating and making available to the public the public-access television program DykeTV. The collection is housed at the Lesbian Herstory Archives and was reformatted from aging analog U-Matic video.

Breaking Barriers: An exhibition on race and libraries

Students from LIS 625 Management of Archives & Special Collections will present their work to create the exhibition “BREAKING BARRIERS,” which sheds light on a pivotal period in Pratt Library School’s history, featuring the experiences of 1943 alumna who changed the face of the school forever.

Digitizing Civil Rights in Brooklyn: A Collaborative Project with the Brooklyn Public Library

Projects in Digital Archives students present on a collaborative project with the Brooklyn Public Library to digitize audio interviews from the Civil Rights in Brooklyn Project. The interviews include interviews with notable civil rights activists from the Brooklyn chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE).

Protest at Pratt: Building the Exhibition

In the spring of 1969, Pratt Institute erupted in protest.

Students, faculty, workers, and members of the community joined together and forced the school to shut down to address issues of civil rights, neighborhood gentrification, and other social and political concerns.

This presentation discusses an exhibition currently on display on the 6th floor that makes use of archival records documenting this turbulent period.

Fantastically Normal: Casual Diversity in Teen Fantasy Media

Casual diversity is exactly what it sounds like: representing people from a wide array of backgrounds without making a big deal of it. It doesn’t erase the importance of…

The Targeted Destruction of Libraries, Archives, and Museums During Wartime

This paper examines incidents occurring in the 20th century onward, with particular focus, though not exclusively, on the destruction of cultural heritage institutions and sites during World War II, the breakup of Yugoslavia and subsequent civil wars, and the current conflicts in Iraq and Syria. Through these examples, I intend to discuss various preventive measures employed in the face of different situations, evaluate and compare the successes and failures in each instance, and suggest ways that further destruction can be avoided.

NAGPRA, Cultural Heritage, and Twenty-One Years of Repatriation

This project maps the recorded history of object repatriation through NAGPRA, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, with the hope of elucidating temporal and geographic trends in repatriation requests and concessions.